24 hours of reconciliation

24 hours of reconciliation
It took all of 24 hours for the results of the rationality test to kick in after traders took time to the read the minutes from Wednesday. Not a heck of a lot has changed in the Feds view. The minutes were far more balanced than the equity market sell-off suggested. The discussions about their inflation target being symmetric indicate that the Feds are less concerned about the updraft from inflationary pressures than current market pricing. Overall there were few if any significant hawkish shift and traders have started to nimbly re-engage the US dollar downside not waiting until Powell’s key Humphrey Hawkins testimony which should clear up more than a few policy concerns.

The Feds will raise interest rates in March on the back of two strong inflation prints post-January meeting, but the market remains comfortably parked in the three rate hike camp for 2018.
This new Fed Chair will be as data dependent as his predecessor so, in reality, no one knows for sure what the Feds will do other than hike somewhere between two and four times in 2018.

Bond Markets

The bond markets continue to trade from a bear market bias, and this is unlikely to change anytime soon given the burdening supply issues which are compounded as the Feds delicately and gingerly pull back on QE largess.

Stock Markets
US equity market rebounded as concerns over rising US interest rates abate. If you were confused by Wednesday 50 pips downside adventure on the S&P post-FOMC minutes, you were not alone. However, until the dust is settled on the Fed policy debate, we should expect more back and forth ahead of Jerome Powells Humphrey Hawkins testimony.
Oil markets

Oil market bid was boosted by DoE inventories which saw a draw of -1.616 million barrels which far better than consensus and more profound than the -.9mn print by the API. While the market continues to communicate concern over rising levels of shale production, this bullish inventory data coupled with a slightly softer USD profile, it’s easy to see why oil prices are finding fresh session highs going into the NY close.
Gold Markets

Gold continues to act as less of a haven hedge and more as a proxy for USD sentiment. Given the greenback is trading within a restricted range as the stage is getting prepared for new Chair Jerome Powell, gold will remain supported by the $ 1324-25 levels given the markets ubiquitous bias to sell the USD.  But the topside should also stay in check as most traders will opt to only aggressively re-engage in  USD downside after Powell clears the policy airwaves in his Humphrey Hawkins testimony.

The Japanese Yen

No need to jump the gun, today’s CPI data will be a crucial driver in JPY sentiment. Post data comments to follow.

The Euro
Fact of fiction, the Euro remains a point of contention, but topside conviction remains low ahead of the Italian election compounded by softer EU economic data.

The Malaysian Ringgit 

The USDMYR landscape is a bit muddled, and this air of uncertainty could extend, more so if opinion on the soft dollar narrative become less reliable. Rising US interest rates and the markets growing sensitivity to local economic data presents some near-term challenges for the Ringgit. Ultimately we believe that US rates are in the process of topping but until we get a definitive signal from the New Fed chair, hopefully, next week, we should expect offshore flows to remain light in the short run.

None the less the Ringgit is getting support from higher oil prices and given we are far removed from the USDJMYR 4.0 danger zone, longer-term investors should continue to look for opportunistic levels to re-engage long MYR posting

The Chinese Yaun

Markets in China return from a week-long holiday only to discover the US has initiated another anti-dumping probe.. This time for rubber bands. Certainly sounds more bark than the bit, but non the less trade war discussion is picking up.

Continue to favour a constructive view on the Yuan given the markets negative USD bias. But he RMB complex will most certainly benefit from expected bond inflows which should accelerate as we move through 2018.

Gold Gains Ground, Puts Brakes on Dollar Rally

Gold has posted gains in the Thursday session, erasing the losses seen on Wednesday. In North American trade, the spot price for an ounce of gold is $1331.17, up 0.50% on the day. On the release front, unemployment claims dropped to 222 thousand, well below the estimate of 230 thousand.

Gold prices remain continue to fluctuate. The base metal has lost 1.3% this week, erasing much of last week’s gains. Concerns that strong US numbers could stoke inflation and more rate hikes sparked the recent turbulence in global stock markets. This has triggered volatility in gold, as gold prices are sensitive to moves (or expected moves) in interest rates. The Fed is currently projecting three rate hikes this year, but if inflation continues to move upwards, many analysts are expecting that the Fed could press the rate trigger four, or even five times in 2018.

The Federal Reserve released the minutes of its January meeting, and as expected, the benchmark rate was left unchanged at a rate between 1.25% and 1.50%. The message from policymakers was that further rate hikes could be in the cards, due to strong economic conditions in the US. In the words of the minutes, policymakers “anticipated that the rate of economic growth in 2018 would exceed their estimates of its sustainable longer-run pace and that labor market conditions would strengthen further”. At the December meeting, the Fed penciled in three rate hikes in 2018, and there was no reference to a quicker pace of hikes in the January minutes. As for inflation, the minutes did not reveal any concern. Most Fed members were of the opinion that inflation would rise towards the Fed target of 2 percent.

 

XAU/USD Fundamentals

Thursday (February 22)

  • 00:15 US FOMC Member Randal Quarles Speaks
  • 8:30 US Unemployment Claims. Estimate 230K. Actual 222K
  • 10:00 US CB Leading Index. Estimate 0.7%. Actual 1.0%
  • 10:00 US FOMC Member William Dudley Speaks
  • 10:30 US Natural Gas Storage. Estimate -121B. Actual -124B
  • 11:00 US Crude Oil Inventories. Estimate 2.2M. Actual -1.6M
  • 12:10 US FOMC Member Raphael Bostic Speaks 

*All release times are GMT

*Key events are in bold

 

XAU/USD for Thursday, February 22, 2018

XAU/USD February 22 at 12:40 EST

Open: 1324.57 High: 1331.37 Low: 1321.03 Close: 1331.17

 

XAU/USD Technical

S3 S2 S1 R1 R2 R3
1260 1285 1307 1337 1375 1416
  • XAU/USD showed little movement in the Asian and European sessions. The pair has posted gains in North American trade
  • 1307 is providing support
  • 1337 is the next resistance line
  • Current range: 1307 to 1337

Further levels in both directions:

  • Below: 1307, 1285 and 1260
  • Above: 1337, 1375, 1416 and 1433

OANDA’s Open Positions Ratio

XAU/USD ratio is showing strong movement towards long positions. Currently, short positions have a slim majority (51%), indicative of a lack of trader bias as to what direction XAU/USD will take next.

This article is for general information purposes only. It is not investment advice or a solution to buy or sell securities. Opinions are the authors; not necessarily that of OANDA Corporation or any of its affiliates, subsidiaries, officers or directors. Leveraged trading is high risk and not suitable for all. You could lose all of your deposited funds.

US Bond Auction TIPS the dollar

US Bond Auction TIPS the dollar

A dismal US 30year TIPS auction is weighing on dollar demand as the sagging bid to cover ratio of 2.31 is signalling dwindling investor appetite as inflationary headwinds build. The dollar is lower because no one wants to own US bonds despite the higher yield, knowing the inflationary headwinds will push yields higher and bond prices lower

The market remains nonplussed by the breakdown of FX /Interest rate correlations and while the debate still rages concerning Wednesday dollar sell-off. I think its time to throw textbook economics out the window as well as the so-called interest rate pivot point. G-10 yield differentials are so tiny that traders could care less about differentials as they become increasingly focused on the future outlook of the expanding US deficits and in particular the budget deficit

Another hot inflation reading as PPI showed a substantial gain but provided no bounce to the buck. When real money is taking the dollar to the woodshed and reluctant to own greenbacks in anyway shape or form, it matters little what the Feds are doing or yields for that matter. And by all indications, we could be in the early stages of protracted dollar sell-off.
Equity Markets

Equity investors are in a happy spot as US stock markets carved out their fifth consecutive day of gains. Despite a midday swoon, markets roared back as investors view the uptick in inflation as non-threatening and remain in buy on dip mode as last weeks equity meltdown looks more and more like an illogical outlier than ever.

Oil Markets

After the decent bounce on the back weaker dollar and Khalid al-Falih suggesting no imminent demise of OPEC and non-member compliance. Not unexpected the markets are becoming a bit more position sensitive heading into the weekend. The weaker US dollar has been a significant component driving market sentiment, and with the dollar entering oversold territory at weeks end, we could see short dollar position pared which could negatively impact interday oil prices.

Frankly giving the evolving vital narratives surrounding OPEC compliance vs Shale output I expect the WTI whipsaw to be as active next week as it was this week. But given the overly bearish outlook for the greenback, we may have printed a short-term floor and dips will remain supported.

Gold Markets

There was very little follow through on the much hotter than expected US PPI print which convinced investors to book some profits after gold rallied hard the previous session. A while the weaker USD is underpinning gold prices, the short dollar speculators a bit overextend suggesting the market could pare back US short dollar risk which may temper topside expectations for Gold prices today. Medium-term bullish conviction remains intact given the higher US inflation profile and weaker USD narrative.

Crypto Markets

Bitcoin buyers were back en masse chasing the dream as the fear of missing ( FOMO)out propelled BTC above 10,000. It appears the recent wave or regulatory worries have been tempered as the massive South Korean market could roar back to life as rumours are circulating that Seoul is looking at licencing several exchanges adding a level of credibility and shoring up severely dented investor confidence.
Currency Markets

The Japanese Yen

Talking about FOMO, is there anyone who is not short USDJPY? Of course, “the crowded trade theory” did cross my mind overnight, for second or two, as USDJPY powered back to 106.80 overnight on the Wakatabe headline, before pressing the sell button again. Dovish or not the market cares little about centeral bank policy these days while looking for any and all opportunities to hammer the dollar mercilessly. With very little chance of intervention at these levels, the JPY bulls should continue to have their way near-term.But short-term speculators are a bit stretched so now is not the time to get greedy.Let’s see what fortunes next week brings.

The Euro

It looks like the grind higher is back in fashion, and the upticks have been relentless over the past 24 hours. But unlike the recent test of 1.25 positioning is much lighter so we could punch higher as traders continue moan over not buying the dips to the low 1.22’s

The Malaysian Ringgit

Powerful bullish signals are falling on deaf ears as investors are far and few between due to Chinese Lunar New Year and quite frankly it’s not worth paying the holiday liquidity premiums to put on risk. Very little offshore interest today so expect the market to remain quiet.

EUR/USD – Euro Unchanged as German GDP, CPI Matches Forecasts

The euro has shown some movement in both directions but is unchanged in the Wednesday session.  Currently, the pair is trading at 1.2356, up 0.04% on the day. It’s a busy day for fundamentals, with key releases out of the eurozone and the US. In Germany, Preliminary GDP slowed to 0.6% in the fourth quarter, matching the estimate. Final CPI declined 0.7%, also matching the forecast. Eurozone Flash GDP for Q4 remained steady at 0.6% for a third straight quarter, matching the estimate. In the US, the markets are expecting mixed inflation numbers. Core CPI is expected to expected to edge lower to 0.2%, while CPI is forecast to improve to 0.1%. The US will also release retail sales reports. Retail Sales is forecast to slow to 0.2%, while Core CPI is forecast to accelerate to 0.5%. Traders should be prepared for movement from EUR/USD during the North American session.

The stock market sell-off has triggered some volatility in the currency markets, and this is causing concern at the ECB. Last week, ECB President Mario Draghi said that he is more confident that eurozone inflation is moving closer to the Bank’s target of just below 2 percent, due to improving economic growth. However, Draghi listed currency market volatility as an obstacle to the inflation target, and added that the ECB would carefully monitor the euro’s exchange rates. Draghi’s concerns about the exchange rate are likely even stronger, after the euro fell 1.6 percent last week. The ECB tapered its massive stimulus program from EUR 60 billion to 30 billion/mth in January, and the markets are on the lookout for hints as to whether the ECB will normalize policy and wind up stimulus in September.

Global stock markets have steadied after last week’s turbulence, but investors remain wary. Wednesday’s US inflation numbers will be closely watched, as inflation fears was a key catalyst of the massive sell-off. The new head of the Federal Reserve, Jerome Powell, sought to send a reassuring message on Tuesday, saying that the Fed is on alert to any risks to financial stability. However, it is clear that the Fed’s hand is limited when it comes to stock markets moves, and the volatility which we saw last week could resume at any time.

The day of reckoning

 

EUR/USD Fundamentals

Wednesday (February 14)

  • 2:00 German Preliminary GDP. Estimate 0.6%. Actual 0.6%
  • 2:00 German Final CPI. Estimate -0.7%. Actual -0.7%
  • 3:00 German Buba President Weidmann Speaks
  • 4:00 Italian Preliminary GDP. Estimate 0.4%. Actual 0.3%
  • 5:00 Eurozone Flash GDP. Estimate 0.6%. Actual 0.6%
  • 5:00 US Industrial Production. Estimate 0.1%. Actual 0.4%
  • Tentative – German 30-year Bond Auction
  • 8:30 US CPI. Estimate 0.3%
  • 8:30 US Core CPI. Estimate 0.2%
  • 8:30 US Core Retail Sales. Estimate 0.2%
  • 8:30 US Retail Sales. Estimate 0.5%
  • 10:00 US Business Inventories. Estimate 0.3%
  • 10:30 US Crude Oil Inventories. Estimate 2.8M

Thursday (February 15)

  • 5:00 Eurozone Trade Balance. Estimate 22.4B
  • 8:30 US PPI. Estimate 0.4%
  • 8:30 US Empire State Manufacturing Index. Estimate 17.7
  • 8:30 US Philly Fed Manufacturing Index. Estimate 21.5
  • 8:30 US Unemployment Claims. Estimate 229K

*All release times are GMT

*Key events are in bold

 

EUR/USD for Wednesday, February 14, 2018

EUR/USD for February 14 at 6:00 EDT

Open: 1.2351 High: 1.2393 Low: 1.2346 Close: 1.2356

 

EUR/USD Technical

S1 S2 S1 R1 R2 R3
1.2092 1.2200 1.2286 1.2357 1.2481 1.2569

EUR/USD inched higher in the Asian session and has retracted in European trade

  • 1.2286 is providing support
  • 1.2357 was tested earlier in resistance and is under strong pressure

Further levels in both directions:

  • Below: 1.2286, 1.2200, 1.2092 and 1.1961
  • Above: 1.2357, 1.2481 and 1.2569
  • Current range: 1.2286 to 1.2357

OANDA’s Open Positions Ratio

EUR/USD ratio is almost unchanged in the Wednesday session. Currently, short positions have a majority (54%), indicative of EUR/USD breaking out and moving lower.

This article is for general information purposes only. It is not investment advice or a solution to buy or sell securities. Opinions are the authors; not necessarily that of OANDA Corporation or any of its affiliates, subsidiaries, officers or directors. Leveraged trading is high risk and not suitable for all. You could lose all of your deposited funds.

This too shall pass.

This too shall pass

It seems anytime I left my desk last week the market was sure to fall apart but after witnessing 25 years + of market corrections, I know storms don’t last forever, and as far as the recent bout of market mayhem is concerned, this too shall pass.

Traders quickly conjectured that the ‘crash’ was mainly due to over-crowded positioning in short equity volatility trades and, therefore, was a relatively isolated event. But this does not mean equity markets are out of the weeds just yet.

With US cash flow models factoring in higher US bond yields, equity markets repricing was always on the cards, but unequivocally the rapidity of the move higher in yields was stifling and stop losses were combatively triggered. And when factored with the unbridled use of leverage in equity positions it likely caused everyone to head for the exits due to cash and margin requirements. The great unknown in the debate is just how much equity froth is based on leverage and to what extent will higher US bond yields squeeze these positions either from a cash position or through asset rotation perspectives.

It was a crazy week for US rate markets, but with powerful US economic signals and interest rates most certainly to rise quicker than expected,  last week tumult could be little more than the start of the equity rollercoaster. If cumulative boost from tax reform and fiscal stimulus nudges GDP outline 1.5% higher over the next six to 9 months how does the Fed possibly stick to their three dot plot projections for 2018?

Bond markets are only in the early stages of buying into the global reflation theme, and increasing inflation expectations are driving nominal yields higher. Last week there was a significant topside move in US yields which suggest we could easily tack on another 30-35 basis points 2’s through 10’s given the US fiscal stimulus backdrop. But even without inflation, global central banks will move rates higher, and this will add to higher yield environment, higher inflation or not.

The Feds seem undeterred from the path of gradual normalisation by the recent market turmoil, and we should not expect a Powell ” Put.” given the economic indicators remain strong. And with FED Dudley chiming in, the recent Stock market volatility is ” no big potatoes.” , just imagine a big potato !!
Oil Markets

U.S. crude oil fell below $59 a barrel for the first time in 2018.Rising US production and a resurgent dollar have stacked pressure on oil prices amid a broad financial market sell-off. And on Friday WTI nosedived after the U.S. rig count rose by 26 rigs in the week through Feb. 9 to a total of 791, supporting the EIA revised production forecast that the US would reach the lofty 11 million bpd by the end of 2018

Also, the possible demise of the OPEC agreement has traders on pins and needles after The head of Russian energy giant Gazprom Neft on Friday said producers could adjust their commitments under the deal as soon as next quarter.

Gold Markets
Without question last week was a stressful week in the Gold markets which saw a little appeal for traditional haven assets as Wall streets sinkhole expanded.

At the moment higher US yields continue to weigh negatively on gold’s appeal over the short term, but the recent market tumult likely has overleveraged equity positions scrambling for margin top-ups, and to a degree, there was cause for some cross-asset unwinds including gold allocations which were probably used to fund margins.

In the more extended run with inflation expectations increasing on the back of US stimulus, this should be a consideration for growing one’s gold portfolio.
At the retail levels, Mainland Gold consumption is rising in preparation for Chinese Lunar New Year holidays, not to mention a last-minute splurge for Valentine’s day should keep retailers busy.

Currency Markets

Currency markets were more or less a mixed bag last week, a potpourri of events but not one convincing driver. And with little to glean from Friday close, currency traders could remain sidelined watching equities markets swings in wonderment at least until this week’s US CPI. Given all this rukus started with an uptick in the wage growth component from this months NFP release; this weeks US inflation data will be a monster of a print.
Japanese Yen

Funding positions continue to unwind which at least in the case of JPY, is having a more significant influence over USDJPY than higher US yields. The reappointment of Kuroda could retrace some speculations on the policy adjustments; the Yen will remain the puppet whose strings are manipulated by equities and fixed income price movements.

Australian Dollar

RBA and SOMP behind us and signalling nor rush to hike for a considerable period given the slight dovish lean in the inflation outlook. The AUD should, therefore, be back trading off risk sentiment, commodity prices and ultimately the underlying USD movements. While the Aussie bounced higher above 78 on positive US equity close on Friday, we should expect commodity currencies trade poor amid the recent volatile market. Rallies will likely remain subdued near-term, so the Aussie should remain vulnerable.

Long Euro short Aussie trade set up should return in vogue over the short term given divergent central bank policy expectations.

Malaysian Ringgit

The market continues to grapple with growth versus the inflation narrative, and as this volatility irons itself out, Asian markets tend to exhibit a higher sensitivity to global fluctuations.

And while the Ringgit is better positioned than regional peers to withstand the recent uptick in Global volatility due to strong Marco foundations and the BNM on the path to interest rate normalisation, The domestic economic landscape will come under intense glare when Q4 GDP is released on Wednesday.

While March a rate hike expectations are low due to the dovish inflation overtones expressed by BNM in January,  but a notable above consensus print on this weeks GDP  will increase the odds of a rate hike later in 2018 and strengthen the Ringgit. ( Consensus is 5.8 )

While oil prices continue to move lower due to US supply concerns, I believe this is more technical driven as dollar index is holding above 90 cents, putting pressure on all commodities. Once this period of excess volatility decreases, the global growth narrative should reassert and commodity prices should rise.

Market Jitters Remain

Market Jitters Remain

US stocks toppled again on Wednesday in choppy and messy fashion after a dispirited US Treasury auction revived concerns about a hawkish Fed, unnerving investors already spooked after the rapid climb in US Treasuries apparently ignited a jump in the Cboe Volatility index.

A deplorable auction with meek demand pushed yields on 10-year US Treasuries to 2.84 percent, up four basis points, with traders now eyeing Monday’s a four-year high of 2.88 percent.

The market is now hedging against the Fed potentially leaning more hawkish which is explaining the uptick in USD and US yields.

There was a glimmer of hope earlier in the NY session that equities markets were finding a happy medium, but the equilibrium shattered as optimism gave way to more selling when Federal Reserve Doves see the inflationary lightbulb flicker.

Fed Evans, who dissented along with Kashkari on the December rate hike, has also embraced Kashkari’s new hawkish tone post-Friday’s earnings data. While his baseline remains a hold in rates until mid-year but with on crucial commonition: “In contrast, suppose inflation picks up more assuredly, as many expect. Then, we still could easily raise rates another three or even four times in 2018 if that were necessary. And I would support such a faster pace if the data point convincingly in this direction.”

Of course, this hawkish Fed discourse has elevated market chatter this morning centring on how the  Trump Administration could react if the USD parades higher on a more hawkish Fed. It certainly makes for exciting international intrigue  to the debate in the wake of comments from ECB member Nowotny who charged that the US Treasury is deliberately putting pressure on the USD

Oil Prices

Oil prices have been getting battered by forces beyond the nodding donkey of late. The weaker narrative has been underpinning prices, but with the market shifting to a more hawkish fed description the US dollar slide has come to a blunt halt is now weighing negatively on oil prices. Notwithstanding the unforeseen disorder in the broader financial system has seeped into the oil markets.

With Oil prices ones WTI fell abruptly after the U.S. government reported crude stockpiles rose by 1.9 million barrels. But its the deluge US production that remains the most significant menace to OPEC production cuts. The bottom line is the US crude production should keep hitting new highs throughout 2018 after reaching an all-time higher of 10.25 m barrels per day. 11’s are not that far away.

Gold Prices

Stronger US dollar and higher US Treasury yields have depressed demand for Gold overnight. And with equities souring and with prices continuing to melt away, gold markets could be susceptible to a stock market rebound.

The shifting Fed narrative that is gathering hawkish following could be the most significant thorn in the Gold Bulls side.

Currency Markets

Japanese Yen

The Yen will be traded like a puppet whose strings are manipulated by equities and fixed income price movements.

Australian Dollar

The risk-off moves from Monday’s equity plunge were enough to liquidate short USD and with continued broad de-risking assignments still being played out. I suspect the Aussie bulls with remain in time out corner until we get back above .7850 and a fraction of risk appetite returns. When you view every possible trade scenario as an ambush, probably best to tread cautiously.
The Malaysian Ringgit

The re-emergence of the Federal Reserve Board Hawks and Oil prices looking very susceptible to ramped up US shale oil production continues to weigh negatively on the MYR.

But indeed, the uptick in market volatility has tamed investors appetite, so bullish signals are far and few between

Plop Plop Fizz Fizz oh what a relief it is

Plop Plop Fizz Fizz oh what a relief it is

A case of turnaround Tuesday or merely the eye of the storm?
What a wild ride the past 48 hours !!  and of course the downward correction in equity market was always on the cards as a combination of multi-year high bond yields, and record highs in US equity markets were foolishly unsustainable. And with interest rates sure to be on the move, equity markets were first to blink. But the voraciousness of the purge is what had many scratching their head, but in reality, in this day of computer-driven algorithmic trading this is not the first nor will it be the last mini flash crash to come.

There was nothing that particularly stood out other than an abundance of inflationary wood chips that formed into combustible markets resulting in the sudden repricing of risk.

But at the end of day bargain hunters reemerged as S&P closed +1.74% with levels marking the area from which Monday’s late NY session sell-off begun.But with so much volatility lingering, equity market will have  lot’s of wood to chop  to restore investors confidence

Adding some calm to the proceedings St. Louis Fed President James Bullard, a non-voting member of the Federal Open Market Committee, attempted to dampen US rate hike euphoria stemming from Friday’s spike in average hourly earnings. He said, “I caution against interpreting good news from labour markets as translating directly into higher inflation.”

OIL

WTI oil prices recovered most of the afternoon losses, rising from $63.45/barrel at the close just shy of 64.0/ barrel in after-hours trading. API weekly crude inventories did not raise as much as forecast.
But near-term sentiment remains tethered to yo-yo strings with equities and the dollar providing the counterweights. Risk aversion does not bode well for oil prices and with all the chatter( including the November EIA report)  about US production ramping up there could be a growing propensity to move lower near-term

Gold

Gold prices hit session lows late Tuesday afternoon as U.S. stocks bounced back up. But with asset rotation from equity to bonds, gold prices did not benefit from this uptick in volatility as investors are erring on the more conservative Bond route given the market volatility. Equity gold hedged unwound in favour a more traditional bond market approach as investors opt to sit out this Volatility ( VIX) driven storm

Far too much volatility in the market and investors across all asset classes remain spooked
Currency Markets

The Japanese Yen

Traditional correlations are finally beginning to assert so we should look for shifting risk sentiment to dominate the forthcoming sessions.

The Euro

EURUSD is entering a period of consolidation in the short term and yesterday certainly matched that argument. But Reuters reports that a final coalition deal is expected at some point late Tuesday in Europe.

The Australian Dollar

The AUD bulls are still licking their wounds after, with the RBA’s dovish twist to guidance feeble retail sales and trade data. However, if you adhere to the Yuan -AUD correlations proxy, one should not exclude the Aussie dollar just yet as the currency is nowhere near down for the count.

The Chinese Yuan

Acting as a haven and rightly so as the CNH remains very resilient to broader US moves. The Pboc 2018 working conference statement has cemented the view that the Mainland is putting more emphasis on opening up Bond markets while promoting the liberalisation of the Yuan. A real win for foreign investors who are finally seeing the barrier to enter China capital markets gradually fall by the wayside.

·

The Malaysian Ringgit

We should not lose sight of the great strides that the Ringgit has made over the past 12 months and while investors confidence will be tested during this sudden uptick in volatility the Ringgit will be more than up for the task.

Malaysia economy remains robust; OIL prices remain firm.With that in mind, Equity and bond markets will continue to attract investors who want exposure in the Ringgit. AS we still hold the view that the Ringgit will be less susceptible to other regional currencies as the BNM could increase interest rates again, Malaysia is the most significant oil exporter, and the central bank welcomes a stronger MYR