Trump and Juncker to set the dollar’s tone

Wednesday July 25: Five things the markets are talking about

Euro equities have found some support, following Asian stocks as earnings season continues, although trade tensions remain to the fore ahead of today’s meeting between President Trump and E.C chief Jean-Claude Junker.

Most G10 currency pairs trade in a tight range awaiting today’s development from the U.S/EU meeting. In fixed income, most U.S Treasuries prices have edged a tad higher along with E.U government bonds.

Markets are struggling to build on Tuesday’s upbeat session as trade relations worries between the world’s biggest economic powers return to the fore.

Elsewhere, the AUD (A$0.7419) has had a mixed reaction with G20 currency pairs after inflation data missed estimates last night, backing the case for the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) to keep interest rates at a record low. The pound (£1.3155) is currently on to gains initiated by PM May taking control of Brexit talks.

In commodities, crude prices are higher, supported by lower inventory levels.

On tap: As the week continues, more corporate earnings come on line, while the ECB’s monetary policy will be the markets focus on Thursday. On Friday, Trump and his economic team are increasingly convinced the GDP numbers will be strong – he expects Q2 GDP to rise to as much as +4.8%!

1. Stocks get the green light

Overnight, Japanese stocks rallied for a second consecutive session, supported by gains in steelmakers and metal producers, as the market welcomed China’s pledges of a more forceful fiscal policy.

The benchmark Nikkei share average rallied +0.46%, expunging a significant of Monday losses on hearsay reports that the BoJ may adjust its policy at next weeks monetary policy meeting (July 30/31). The broader Topix gained +0.47%.

Down-under, Aussie stocks underperformed as the major banks faltered again following a soft CPI print. The S&P/ASX 200 fell -0.3%, with only the resources sectors showing a meaningful gains, supported by higher commodity prices. In S. Korea, the Kospi struggled overnight, barely getting back into positive territory. The benchmark fell -0.3% to move back toward its 14-month lows. Drug stocks were a noted sore point, while tech stocks eliminated those declines.

In Hong Kong, stocks rallied overnight led by the energy sector as investor sentiment improved on signs that the PBoC is loosening monetary and fiscal policies to prevent a domestic economic slowdown. The Hang Seng index rose +0.9%, while the China Enterprises Index also gained +0.9%.

In China, equities ease after three-straight days of gains. The blue-chip CSI300 index ended down -0.1% while the Shanghai Composite Index also eased -0.1%.

In Europe, regional bourses trade mixed amid another busy day for earnings.

U.S stocks are set to open in the ‘red’ (-0.1%).

Indices: Stoxx600 -0.1% at 388.0, FTSE -0.6% at 7659, DAX -0.2% at 12662, CAC-40 +0.2% at 5444, IBEX-35 -0.3% at 9742, FTSE MIB +0.1% at 21,897, SMI +0.1% at 9016, S&P 500 Futures -0.1%

2. Oil rises as U.S crude inventories fall, gold higher

Oil prices remain supported after U.S data yesterday showed that domestic crude inventories fell more than expected last week, easing worries about oversupply.

Global benchmark Brent crude was up +50c, or +0.7% at +$73.94 a barrel, after gaining +0.5% yesterday. U.S light crude is +5c higher at +$68.57, having risen nearly +1% in its previous session.

API data yesterday showed that U.S crude inventories fell by -3.2M barrels in the week to July 20 to +407.6M barrels. Consensus was expecting a decrease of -2.3M barrels.

Dealers will take their cues from today’s DoE report (10:30 am EDT).

Ahead of the U.S open, gold prices have inched higher as the ‘big’ dollar held steady ahead of today’s U.S and E.C meetings. Spot gold is up +0.2% an ounce. U.S. gold futures for August delivery are +0.1% higher.

3. Yields play in a tight range

Most sovereign bond yields continue to consolidate as dealers search for fresh impetus to head in a new direction. The economic calendar provides no new hints ahead of tomorrow’s ECB meeting.

However, today’s meeting between E.C Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and President Trump could fuel further trade concerns, while cross-market themes and the lack of market liquidity can still provide erratic price moves.

The yield on U.S 10-year Treasuries has dipped -1 bps to +2.94%. In Germany, the 10-year Bund yield has fallen -1 bps to +0.39%, while in the U.K, the 10-year Gilt yield has decreased -1 bps to +1.264%.

4. FX markets trade sideways

The FX market trades in a tight range ahead of the today’s key Trump/Juncker trade talks stateside.

The EUR/USD (€1.1703) is slightly higher, but contained within this months trading range. E.U data continues to take the back-stage ahead of tomorrows ECB policy decision.

Note: The ECB is widely expected to leave its key policy settings and guidance unchanged after it announced its plans for monetary policy beyond September last month

USD/JPY (¥111.14) is holding above the psychological ¥111 level as fixed income dealers price-in that the BoJ would not likely make any policy changes until at least October.

Elsewhere, China is letting the yuan slide primarily to combat a slackening economy, as the government rolls out more pro-growth measures amid an intensifying trade feud with the U.S.

5. German July Ifo business expectations lowest in four-months

German data this morning revealed that domestic business expectations fell further this month, albeit only marginally, according to the Ifo Institute’s monthly survey.

While the Ifo measure of the current business situation improved a bit, the expectations component hit its lowest level in two-years.

The Ifo business-climate index fell to 101.7 from 101.8 in June.

Note: It marks the lowest reading in 16-months.

“The German economy continues to expand, but at a slower pace,” said Clemens Fuest, the president of the Ifo Institute.

Digging deeper, uncertainty about global trade policy remains high, with potential tariffs on the auto sector being a key concern for Germany.

Forex heatmap

Dollar Flat on Trade and Currency War Comments OANDA Podcast

OANDA Senior Market Analyst Alfonso Esparza reviews the major upcoming market news, macro analysis and economic indicator releases that will impact currencies, stocks other asset classes.

Subscription available on iTunes https://goo.gl/TZEWRW and GooglePlay https://goo.gl/cRBk39. Tune in every Tuesday and don’t miss a beat as we cover the hottest trends impacting the markets in the week ahead. Trading is high risk. Losses can exceed investment.

The USD fell against major pairs on Friday after US President Donald Trump tweeted that China and the EU manipulate their currency. Trade war escalation has reached a second phase at a time when American politics are having an identity crisis with the ongoing Russian interference during the 2016 elections. Steven Mnuchin will head to Buenos Aires to take part in the finance ministers G20 meeting with trade and monetary policies sure to be a topic of discussion. The European Central Bank (ECB) will announce its main refinancing rate on Thursday, July 26 at 7:45 am EDT with little expectations of a change. ECB President Mario Draghi will host a press conference at 8:30 am EDT with the market focused on his comments for insights into the monetary policy of the central bank.

US President worried about Fed’s monetary policy triggers currency war
European Central Bank meeting anticipated to be a quiet affair
Canadian inflation and retail sales beat expectations

– US President worried about Fed’s monetary policy triggers currency war
– European Central Bank meeting anticipated to be a quiet affair
– Canadian inflation and retail sales beat expectations

Yen Loses Safe Haven Appeal

The trade is familiar to investors worldwide: in times of turmoil, rush for cover by buying the Japanese yen.

This year a global trade row has erupted, Donald Trump has lamented the dollar’s strength – ignoring a custom that U.S. presidents avoid openly interfering in financial markets – and the Chinese yuan has tumbled.



And yet the yen has stayed resolutely weak, becoming the weakest of the G10 developed market currencies this month.

The yen’s safe-haven status is not in doubt, underpinned by Japan’s nearly two trillion yen ($18 billion) monthly trade surplus. But without a massive world market shock to discourage Japanese investors from buying foreign assets, the yen is likely to stay weak – above all because the Bank of Japan lags behind its central bank peers in ending monetary stimulus.

via Reuters

Live FX Market Analysis – 24 July 2018

In this week’s FX webinar, Senior Market Analyst Craig Erlam discusses the latest events that are moving financial markets – Trump attacks the Fed, Brexit plans widely criticized etc – and previews the week ahead.

Craig also gives his live analysis on EURUSD (9:22), GBPUSD (11:48), EURGBP (18:45), AUDUSD (19:34), USDCAD (21:04), GBPCAD (22:14), NZDUSD (23:31), USDJPY (24:38), GBPJPY (27:41) and EURJPY (29:09).

U.S dollar boosted by higher Treasury yields

Tuesday July 24: Five things the markets are talking about

Overnight, Euro bourses along with U.S equity futures have edged a tad higher on the back of a plethora of positive corporate earnings boosting investor sentiment.

Also, China’s determination to support the world’s second largest economy has helped to support various risk assets in the Asia session overnight. Is there another cut to its reserve-requirement ratios (RRR) coming? China needs to shore up economic growth in the face of an actual trade war.

In FX, the EUR (€1.1695) is little changed, supported by German data showing that they have so far resisted worries over disruption to trade. In China, the People’s Bank of China (PBoC) guided the Yuan to new 12-month lows.

U.S Treasuries have backed up a tad along with Euro sovereign bonds.

Elsewhere, crude oil prices trade atop of its recent lows, while gold prices are steady.

On tap: As the week continues, more corporate earnings come on line, while the ECB’s monetary policy will be the markets focus on Thursday. On Friday, Trump and his economic team are increasingly convinced the GDP numbers will be strong – he expects Q2 GDP to rise to as much as +4.8%!

1. Stocks see the light

Shares in Asia rallied on news China will increase spending on infrastructure among other measures to bolster growth.

In Japan, the Nikkei share average bounced overnight, reducing Monday’s losses as the yen’s (¥111.23) rally stalled exporters. The Nikkei ended the day up +0.51%. The index had fallen -1.3% the previous session as the yen soared outright. The broader Topix rallied +0.47%.

Down-under, Aussie shares rallied on Tuesday as firmer commodity prices supported material stocks, while financials followed its Wall Street peers. The S&P/ASX 200 index rose +0.6% at the close of trade. The benchmark fell -0.9% on Monday. In S. Korea, the Kospi stock index rose overnight, up +0.48%, in line with its Asian peers, while the won tumbled ahead of Friday’s U.S advanced GDP growth.

Note: South Korea’s Kospi has experienced the weakest H1 in five-years – down -5.7%.

In China, government bond yields and equities rallied overnight after authorities promised to pursue a more ‘vigorous’ fiscal policy, in an effort to support growth amid rising economic headwinds. The blue-chip CSI300 index rose +0.9% while the Shanghai Composite Index ended up +1.1%. In Hong Kong, the Hang Sang index rose +1.44%, while the China Enterprises Index gained +0.5%.

In Europe, regional indices trade higher across the board, supported by generally strong manufacturing PMI data and upbeat earnings from European names.

U.S stocks are set to open in the ‘black’ (+0.2%).

Indices: Stoxx600 +0.9% at 388.2, FTSE +0.7% at 7710, DAX +1.4% at 12718, CAC-40 +0.9% at 5424, IBEX-35 +0.7% at 9794, FTSE MIB +1.1% at 21,893, SMI +0.4% at 8992, S&P 500 Futures +0.2%

2. Oil is steady as U.S/Iran row balances trade worries, gold lower

Oil prices remain little changed as rising tension between the U.S and Iran highlight potential risks to supply, while escalating trade disputes raised the prospect of slower economic growth and perhaps weaker energy demand.

Brent crude oil is unchanged at +$73.06 a barrel, while U.S light crude is up +15c at +$68.04.

Note: Both benchmarks have fallen this month as crude supplies from Russia, Saudi Arabia and other members of the OPEC have increased and unscheduled production losses have eased.

To date, market sentiment remains driven by geopolitical worries in the Middle East or that Trump’s trade dispute with G7 economies could dampen global growth.

Note: Iran, OPEC’s third-largest producer is pumping +3.75M bpd, has come under increasing U.S pressure, with President Trump pushing countries to cut all imports of Iranian oil from November.

Ahead of the U.S open, gold prices have edged down overnight on a firmer dollar and a rise in U.S Treasury yields and as the markets reaction to the dispute between the U.S and Iran remains somewhat muted. Spot gold is down -0.3% at +$1,220.27 an ounce, while U.S gold futures for August delivery are -0.4% lower at +$1,220.20 an ounce.

3. Sovereign yields continue to back up

The Nikkei has suggested that politics could be a factor at the BoJ upcoming July 31 policy decision. It suggests that political considerations could pressure the central bank to take action at the July meeting, as a policy decision at the September meeting could influence the LDP leadership elections.

It also notes that Japan has regional elections in April 2019, while in October of 2019 the consumption tax is expected to rise to +10% from +8% – consensus believes the further you look out the ‘curve’ the more difficult it will be to make changes to policy.

In Canada, sovereign bond prices fell yesterday after positive economic data weakened the markets demand for the safety of government debt. Yields on the 10-year Treasury note were recently at +2.22% after it was reported that Canadian wholesale trade rose +1.2% m/m in May.

Note: Last Friday saw better than expected Canadian data – annual inflation had reached a new six-year high, boosting market expectations for another rate increase from the BoC this year.

Elsewhere, the yield on U.S 10-year notes have gained +1 bps to +2.96%, the highest in almost six-weeks. In Germany, the 10-year Bund yield rallied +1 bps to +0.42%, the highest in almost five-weeks. In the U.K, the 10-year Gilt yield climbed +3 bps to +1.298%, the highest in two-weeks.

4. China fixes yuan at fresh one-year low

Overnight, the U.S. dollar has regained some strength, boosted by rallying Treasury yields.

Elsewhere, Chinese officials guided the yuan -0.4% weaker outright, fixing the Chinese currency at a fresh one-year low. The PBoC set the dollar’s midpoint for daily trading at ¥6.7891, compared with ¥6.7593 Monday. The ‘mighty’ dollar ended onshore trading yesterday at ¥6.7834.

EUR/USD (€1.1685) has reversed some of its initial losses in the Euro session as the major PMI manufacturing data beat expectations. The Euro upside has been limited in the belief that the ECB is on hold regardless of any incoming data.

USD/JPY (¥111.23) is holding above the psychological ¥111 handle as the market debates the prospect of a possible tweaking the BoJ’s policy on July 31.

GBP/USD (£1.3109) trades atop of its recent lows as BoE member, Anthony Broadbent, stated that he was not sure if whether he would vote for rate hike next month.

5. German growth strongest since February

July data saw a further pick-up in the rate of growth of Germany’s private sector economy from a 20-month low in May to a five-month high, driven by a stronger increase in manufacturing output.

The IHS Markit Flash Germany Composite Output Index rose to 55.2 in July from 54.8 in June, to signal a second successive monthly acceleration in the rate of growth in private sector business activity.

Digging deeper, new order growth also gathered pace, while private firms continued to add staff and price pressures intensified.

Note: By sector, services business activity increased at a solid rate that was little changed from June, while manufacturing output growth was the fastest since April.

Forex heatmap

Morgan Stanley Says 2018 Most Volatile Year Since 2008

The year is only halfway through and already 2018 is on track to be the most volatile since the financial crisis, Morgan Stanley analysts wrote in a note published Monday.

Morgan Stanley defines a “large move” as an unexpected single day change in price compared to “what was implied by options markets at the time” in global stocks, bonds and currencies, the note said. The firm charted multiple markets around the world, ranging from currencies like the Australian dollar and the euro to commodities like Brent crude oil and copper. And of course, the firm looked at U.S. stocks.



The large moves Morgan Stanley is tracking are so-called “3-sigma” events, which is a statistical way of calculating data that is within three standard deviations of a mean.

2018 is on track to have more than 25 such moves in financial markets, the most since 2008 when there were nearly 35, according to the firm.

“Surprises (large moves relative to expectations) are becoming more common across asset classes,” wrote strategist Andrew Sheets.

Sheets and team believe that “tightening monetary policy and geopolitical risks” may be helping boost this year’s uptick in volatility.

And the remainder of the year is set to be even wilder because of the U.S. midterm elections, CFRA analysts said in a note Monday.

via CNBC

Narrow Spread on Rates Suggest Market is Not Buying into Growth

Despite two hikes of the Federal Funds rate this year, ranging between 1.75 percent and 2 percent, long-term rates have not kept pace, causing the yield curve to flatten and stoking fears of a recession.

Just about every time the U.S. Treasurys yield curve has flattened in the past, the U.S. economy has tanked shortly afterwards. Yet Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell told Congress that he intends to keep gradually raising interest rates “for now.”



“[Federal Reserve Bank] Chairman Powell is bullish on the economy, but we’re concerned he’s overly bullish on the pace of rate hikes,” said George Rusnak, co-head of global fixed-income strategy at Wells Fargo. He worries that a newly aggressive Fed could hasten a downturn in the currently strong economy. “The market doesn’t think the future growth and inflation are there.”

via CNBC

Oil Drops After Oversupply Concerns Take Over

Oil prices pulled back in volatile trading on Monday as both crude benchmarks fell after rallying more than $1 a barrel early in the session on escalating tensions between the U.S. and Iran.


West Texas Intermediate graph

Brent crude oil LCOc1 fell 27 cents to trade at $72.80 a barrel by 12:43 p.m. EDT (1643 GMT) after earlier strengthening to a high of $74.50. U.S. crude CLc1 was down 43 cents at $67.83 a barrel, down from a session high of $69.31.

The latest downward jog came after the market focus returned to oversupply risk as Saudi Arabia and other large producers ramp up production ahead of the November deadline for other countries to comply with U.S. sanctions on Iranian crude sales, said Phil Flynn, an analyst at Price Futures Group in Chicago.

via Reuters

G20 Warn That Downside Risks Are Increasing

Global finance leaders called on Sunday for stepped-up dialogue to prevent trade and geopolitical tensions from hurting growth, but ended a two-day G-20 meeting with little consensus on how to resolve multiple disputes over U.S. tariff actions.

The finance ministers and central bank governors from the world’s 20 largest economies warned that growth, while still strong, was becoming less synchronized and downside risks over the short- and medium-term had increased.



“These include rising financial vulnerabilities, heightened trade and geopolitical tensions, global imbalances, inequality and structurally weak growth, particularly in some advanced economies,” the G-20 finance officials said in a communique.

“We … recognize the need to step up dialogue and actions to mitigate risks and enhance confidence,” the communique said.

This marked a strengthening of language compared to their previous statement issued in March, in which they simply “recognize the need for further dialogue.”

“The latest language suggests a great deal of urgency about resolving these issues,” Australia Treasurer Scott Morrison told Reuters in an interview, adding that the ministers had made it clear in the discussion that they were concerned about “tit-for-tat measures” and that open trade was the goal.

via CNBC

Bank of Japan (BOJ) Hints At Tightening Sooner than Expected

Signs that the Bank of Japan (BoJ) might scale back its monetary stimulus faster than expected sent tremors through bond markets on Monday, while European stocks and U.S. futures slipped as threats of further U.S. tariffs on China drained risk appetite.



Europe’s bond yields climbed after a Reuters report that the BoJ was discussing modifying its huge easing programme sent Japan’s 10-year bond yield to a six-month high.

The report rekindled anxieties about monetary stimulus easing around the world and piled further pressure on investors already struggling to navigate rising protectionism.

via Reuters