A Guide to the Italian Election

Italians go to the polls on March 4 in an election that could either help to rebalance the political environment or send shockwaves through the country and beyond.Voting will take place between 7 a.m. (1 a.m. ET) and 11 p.m. local time. The result is not expected to be officially counted until 2 p.m. Monday, however.Here’s a guide to the vote.Who are the main parties and candidates?Italian politics can seem a muddle of shifting alliances and allegiances and the country is not renowned for its political stability, having had 64 governments and numerous prime ministers since World War II.In 2018, there are “old faces” to look out for, such as the ever-resurgent Silvio Berlusconi, and some new personalities too.Most importantly, Italy’s political landscape is littered with coalitions and these could be decisive in the election result. So while the main parties are important, the alliances with other minor parties could prove decisive.

Source: Italy election 2018: A simple guide to the vote – CNBC

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Italians Warned of Mafia Meddling

There is a risk of Italy’s mafias “conditioning” the general election in March, Italy’s Interior Minister Marco Minniti warned.Italians go to the polls on March 4 and Minniti said there was “too much silence” on the “concrete” risk of the mafias posing a threat to democracy and “the freedom to vote,” Italian news agency ANSA reported.”We’re in the swing of the electoral competition and … There is a concrete risk of the mafias conditioning electors’ free vote,” Minniti said on Wednesday as he presented an annual report to the Anti-Mafia commission in Rome.

Source: Italian election could see mafia interference – CNBC

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