U.S dollar boosted by higher Treasury yields

Tuesday July 24: Five things the markets are talking about

Overnight, Euro bourses along with U.S equity futures have edged a tad higher on the back of a plethora of positive corporate earnings boosting investor sentiment.

Also, China’s determination to support the world’s second largest economy has helped to support various risk assets in the Asia session overnight. Is there another cut to its reserve-requirement ratios (RRR) coming? China needs to shore up economic growth in the face of an actual trade war.

In FX, the EUR (€1.1695) is little changed, supported by German data showing that they have so far resisted worries over disruption to trade. In China, the People’s Bank of China (PBoC) guided the Yuan to new 12-month lows.

U.S Treasuries have backed up a tad along with Euro sovereign bonds.

Elsewhere, crude oil prices trade atop of its recent lows, while gold prices are steady.

On tap: As the week continues, more corporate earnings come on line, while the ECB’s monetary policy will be the markets focus on Thursday. On Friday, Trump and his economic team are increasingly convinced the GDP numbers will be strong – he expects Q2 GDP to rise to as much as +4.8%!

1. Stocks see the light

Shares in Asia rallied on news China will increase spending on infrastructure among other measures to bolster growth.

In Japan, the Nikkei share average bounced overnight, reducing Monday’s losses as the yen’s (¥111.23) rally stalled exporters. The Nikkei ended the day up +0.51%. The index had fallen -1.3% the previous session as the yen soared outright. The broader Topix rallied +0.47%.

Down-under, Aussie shares rallied on Tuesday as firmer commodity prices supported material stocks, while financials followed its Wall Street peers. The S&P/ASX 200 index rose +0.6% at the close of trade. The benchmark fell -0.9% on Monday. In S. Korea, the Kospi stock index rose overnight, up +0.48%, in line with its Asian peers, while the won tumbled ahead of Friday’s U.S advanced GDP growth.

Note: South Korea’s Kospi has experienced the weakest H1 in five-years – down -5.7%.

In China, government bond yields and equities rallied overnight after authorities promised to pursue a more ‘vigorous’ fiscal policy, in an effort to support growth amid rising economic headwinds. The blue-chip CSI300 index rose +0.9% while the Shanghai Composite Index ended up +1.1%. In Hong Kong, the Hang Sang index rose +1.44%, while the China Enterprises Index gained +0.5%.

In Europe, regional indices trade higher across the board, supported by generally strong manufacturing PMI data and upbeat earnings from European names.

U.S stocks are set to open in the ‘black’ (+0.2%).

Indices: Stoxx600 +0.9% at 388.2, FTSE +0.7% at 7710, DAX +1.4% at 12718, CAC-40 +0.9% at 5424, IBEX-35 +0.7% at 9794, FTSE MIB +1.1% at 21,893, SMI +0.4% at 8992, S&P 500 Futures +0.2%

2. Oil is steady as U.S/Iran row balances trade worries, gold lower

Oil prices remain little changed as rising tension between the U.S and Iran highlight potential risks to supply, while escalating trade disputes raised the prospect of slower economic growth and perhaps weaker energy demand.

Brent crude oil is unchanged at +$73.06 a barrel, while U.S light crude is up +15c at +$68.04.

Note: Both benchmarks have fallen this month as crude supplies from Russia, Saudi Arabia and other members of the OPEC have increased and unscheduled production losses have eased.

To date, market sentiment remains driven by geopolitical worries in the Middle East or that Trump’s trade dispute with G7 economies could dampen global growth.

Note: Iran, OPEC’s third-largest producer is pumping +3.75M bpd, has come under increasing U.S pressure, with President Trump pushing countries to cut all imports of Iranian oil from November.

Ahead of the U.S open, gold prices have edged down overnight on a firmer dollar and a rise in U.S Treasury yields and as the markets reaction to the dispute between the U.S and Iran remains somewhat muted. Spot gold is down -0.3% at +$1,220.27 an ounce, while U.S gold futures for August delivery are -0.4% lower at +$1,220.20 an ounce.

3. Sovereign yields continue to back up

The Nikkei has suggested that politics could be a factor at the BoJ upcoming July 31 policy decision. It suggests that political considerations could pressure the central bank to take action at the July meeting, as a policy decision at the September meeting could influence the LDP leadership elections.

It also notes that Japan has regional elections in April 2019, while in October of 2019 the consumption tax is expected to rise to +10% from +8% – consensus believes the further you look out the ‘curve’ the more difficult it will be to make changes to policy.

In Canada, sovereign bond prices fell yesterday after positive economic data weakened the markets demand for the safety of government debt. Yields on the 10-year Treasury note were recently at +2.22% after it was reported that Canadian wholesale trade rose +1.2% m/m in May.

Note: Last Friday saw better than expected Canadian data – annual inflation had reached a new six-year high, boosting market expectations for another rate increase from the BoC this year.

Elsewhere, the yield on U.S 10-year notes have gained +1 bps to +2.96%, the highest in almost six-weeks. In Germany, the 10-year Bund yield rallied +1 bps to +0.42%, the highest in almost five-weeks. In the U.K, the 10-year Gilt yield climbed +3 bps to +1.298%, the highest in two-weeks.

4. China fixes yuan at fresh one-year low

Overnight, the U.S. dollar has regained some strength, boosted by rallying Treasury yields.

Elsewhere, Chinese officials guided the yuan -0.4% weaker outright, fixing the Chinese currency at a fresh one-year low. The PBoC set the dollar’s midpoint for daily trading at ¥6.7891, compared with ¥6.7593 Monday. The ‘mighty’ dollar ended onshore trading yesterday at ¥6.7834.

EUR/USD (€1.1685) has reversed some of its initial losses in the Euro session as the major PMI manufacturing data beat expectations. The Euro upside has been limited in the belief that the ECB is on hold regardless of any incoming data.

USD/JPY (¥111.23) is holding above the psychological ¥111 handle as the market debates the prospect of a possible tweaking the BoJ’s policy on July 31.

GBP/USD (£1.3109) trades atop of its recent lows as BoE member, Anthony Broadbent, stated that he was not sure if whether he would vote for rate hike next month.

5. German growth strongest since February

July data saw a further pick-up in the rate of growth of Germany’s private sector economy from a 20-month low in May to a five-month high, driven by a stronger increase in manufacturing output.

The IHS Markit Flash Germany Composite Output Index rose to 55.2 in July from 54.8 in June, to signal a second successive monthly acceleration in the rate of growth in private sector business activity.

Digging deeper, new order growth also gathered pace, while private firms continued to add staff and price pressures intensified.

Note: By sector, services business activity increased at a solid rate that was little changed from June, while manufacturing output growth was the fastest since April.

Forex heatmap

Canadian Soy Growers Could Win From Cancelled China Contracts

Canada might soon be reaping the benefits from the recent string of canceled soybean contracts, Simon Wilson, executive director of the North Dakota Trade Office, told CNBC.

“The big competitor for us is Canada,” Wilson told CNBC’s Contessa Brewer on Friday’s “Power Lunch.” “They have similar weather, similar production cycle. And for us, we’ve always been competing with them.


usdcad Canadian dollar graph, July 23, 2018

But now, after Chinese buyers canceled all of their firm orders for food-grade soybeans earlier this month, the competition might heat up. The scrapped contracts amount to a loss of $1.2 million to $1.5 million, but that’s a small portion of North Dakota’s $30 million to $35 million in annual contracts, which are usually finalized in the summer months.

Wilson said Chinese trade delegations, previously scheduled for September, have gone “radio silent on us.”

“There’s a lot of money in this,” he said. “It’s a big market. China’s a massive market for soybeans.”

via CNBC

G20 Warn That Downside Risks Are Increasing

Global finance leaders called on Sunday for stepped-up dialogue to prevent trade and geopolitical tensions from hurting growth, but ended a two-day G-20 meeting with little consensus on how to resolve multiple disputes over U.S. tariff actions.

The finance ministers and central bank governors from the world’s 20 largest economies warned that growth, while still strong, was becoming less synchronized and downside risks over the short- and medium-term had increased.



“These include rising financial vulnerabilities, heightened trade and geopolitical tensions, global imbalances, inequality and structurally weak growth, particularly in some advanced economies,” the G-20 finance officials said in a communique.

“We … recognize the need to step up dialogue and actions to mitigate risks and enhance confidence,” the communique said.

This marked a strengthening of language compared to their previous statement issued in March, in which they simply “recognize the need for further dialogue.”

“The latest language suggests a great deal of urgency about resolving these issues,” Australia Treasurer Scott Morrison told Reuters in an interview, adding that the ministers had made it clear in the discussion that they were concerned about “tit-for-tat measures” and that open trade was the goal.

via CNBC

BoJ easing talk sends bond yields up

Signs that the Bank of Japan (BoJ) might scale back its monetary stimulus faster than expected sent tremors through bond markets on Monday, while European stocks slipped as threats of further U.S. tariffs on China drained risk appetite.

Europe’s bond yields climbed after a Reuters report that the BoJ was discussing modifying its huge easing programme sent Japan’s 10-year bond yield to a six-month high.

The report rekindled anxieties about monetary stimulus easing around the world and piled further pressure on investors already struggling to navigate rising protectionism.

The yield on Europe’s benchmark bond, the German 10-year Bund, hit a one-month high of 0.39 percent and U.S. 10-year Treasury yields also hit their highest in a month at 2.90 percent.

The yen climbed to two-week highs against the dollar and was last up 0.2 percent at 111.14 per dollar.

“It’s all that concern investors have about the move from global quantitative easing to global quantitative tightening. That fear gets stoked when you have reports such as this,” Psigma Investment Management’s head of investment strategy, Rory McPherson.

“The ECB meeting this week will be more in focus now that we’ve had this concern about Japan.”

The dollar index meanwhile bounced back, up 0.1 percent from two-week lows hit after U.S. President Trump criticised the Federal Reserve’s tightening policy and accused the European Union and China of manipulating their currencies.

“We see the latest news on trade policy as pointing to continued high risk of escalation between the U.S. and China, and a renewed focus of the Trump Administration on currency matters,” Goldman Sachs analysts said.

Beijing said it has no intention of devaluing the yuan to help exports.

Trump’s comments about rates also helped the Treasury yield curve reach its steepest in three weeks. The yield curve’s flattening has been seen by some as a sign of an impending recession.

The U.S. president’s new threats to slap duties on all $500 billion of U.S. imports from China triggered sell-offs across stock markets, though good earnings kept a lid on losses.

The MSCI all-country world index declined just 0.1 percent while MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan fell 0.2 percent.

Reuters

USD/CAD – Canadian dollar jumps after sharp retail sales reports

The Canadian dollar is almost unchanged in the Monday session, after strong gains on Friday. Currently, USD/CAD is trading at 1.3139, down 0.02% on the day. On the release front, it’s a quiet start to the week. Canadian Wholesale Sales jumped 1.2%, crushing the estimate of 0.6%. This marked the strongest gain since October. In the U.S, the sole indicator is Existing Home Sales, which is expected to rise to 5.46 million.

Canadian retail sales indicators for May sparkled on Friday, boosting the Canadian dollar 1.0 percent. Core Retail Sales jumped 1.4%, after failing to post a gain for three straight months. This easily beat the forecast of 0.6%. Retail Sales rebounded 2.0%, above the forecast of 1.0%. This follows a decline of 1.2% in April. Consumer inflation remained pegged at 0.1%, matching the forecast.

The U.S. dollar was broadly lower on Friday, after U.S President Trump made comments critical of Federal Reserve monetary policy. U.S presidents traditionally do not comment on moves by the Fed, but that did not prevent Trump from tweeting on Thursday that “tightening now hurts all that we have done”. On the weekend, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin engaged in damage control, saying at the G-20 meeting that Trump was not interfering with the Fed policy of gradually raising rates. However, investors weren’t buying Mnuchin’s apologetics, and the U.S dollar continued to lose ground in Monday’s Asian session. There was more for investors to fret over, as Trump also attacked the EU and China for manipulating their currencies and keeping interest rates lower. This has raised concerns that the current global trade war could be followed by a currency war.

  Dollar weaker at the start of the week as G-20 comments on trade wars

 

USD/CAD Fundamentals

Monday (July 23)

  • 8:3o Canadian Wholesales Sales. Estimate 0.6%. Actual 1.4%
  • 10:00 US Existing Home Sales. Estimate 5.46M

*All release times are DST

*Key events are in bold

 

USD/CAD for Monday, July 23, 2018

USD/CAD, July 23 at 7:55 DST

Open: 1.3141 High: 1.3156 Low: 1.3114 Close: 1.3138

 

USD/CAD Technical

S3 S2 S1 R1 R2 R3
1.2831 1.2970 1.3067 1.3160 1.3292 1.3436

In the Asian session, USD/CAD ticked lower but then gave up these gains. The pair has showed limited movement in European trade

  • 1.3067 is providing support
  • 1.3160 is under pressure in resistance
  • Current range: 1.3067 to 1.3160

Further levels in both directions:

  • Below: 1.3067, 1.2970 and 1.2831
  • Above: 1.3160, 1.3292, 1.3436 and 1.3530

Canada: Wholesale trade, May 2018

Wholesale sales rose 1.2% to a record $63.7 billion in May. Sales were up in four of seven subsectors, representing approximately 50% of total wholesale sales.

The miscellaneous, building material and supplies, and farm product subsectors contributed the most to the gains in May, while the motor vehicle and parts subsector posted the largest decline.

In volume terms, wholesale sales increased 1.3%.

Sales increase in four of seven subsectors, led by the miscellaneous and the building material and supplies subsectors

In dollar terms, the miscellaneous subsector reported the largest increase in May, as sales rose 7.8% to $8.3 billion. Sales were up in four of five industries, led by the agricultural supplies industry (+25.6%) following a 5.4% decline in April. In volume terms, the agricultural supplies industry increased 27.4%.

Sales in the building material and supplies subsector rose 5.0% to $9.7 billion as all industries posted gains in May. Much of May’s increase was attributable to higher sales in the lumber, millwork, hardware and other building supplies industry, up 7.3% to $4.9 billion. This was the third consecutive increase for the industry and the highest sales level since July 2017. In volume terms, the industry increased 6.8%, indicating that the gain in the current dollar series was partly price driven. In May, international merchandise trade reported gains in both imports and exports of building and packaging materials.

Following a 17.5% decline in April, the farm product subsector rebounded in May, up 25.5% to $859 million. This was the third increase in four months and the highest level since November 2017. A 28.5% increase in volume terms signifies that price changes had no impact on the growth seen in the current dollar series. Exports of farm and fishing products increased in May.

The motor vehicle and supplies subsector recorded the largest decline in dollar terms in May, down 2.5% to $11.1 billion. This was the second consecutive monthly decline and the fifth drop in six months, bringing the subsector to its lowest level since December 2016. The sole contributor to the decrease was the motor vehicle industry, down 3.7% to $8.9 billion. Imports and exports of passenger cars and light trucks as well as manufacturing sales of motor vehicles declined in May.

Sales increase in eight provinces

Sales were up in eight provinces in May, accounting for 49% of total wholesale sales in Canada. Higher sales in the western provinces led the gains. In dollar terms, Alberta contributed the most to the increase, more than offsetting the decline reported in Ontario.

Alberta reported its fifth increase in six months, with sales rising 6.7% to $7.3 billion, their highest level on record. Sales were up in six subsectors, led by the miscellaneous subsector (+26.7%). The agricultural supplies industry within the miscellaneous subsector contributed the most to the gains.

Sales in Saskatchewan increased for the third consecutive month, up 9.8% to $2.3 billion—the highest level since December 2016. The miscellaneous subsector (+17.2%) led the gains, with the agricultural supplies industry contributing the most to the increase.

In British Columbia, sales grew 1.9% to $6.7 billion, its third consecutive gain. The gains were led by the machinery, equipment and supplies subsector (+11.4%), more than offsetting the 10.2% decline in April.

Sales in Nova Scotia rose 9.0% to $962.3 million, driven by gains in the food, beverage and tobacco subsector (+38.8%).

Ontario posted its second consecutive monthly decline in May, down 0.9% to $32.1 billion. The motor vehicle and parts (-4.6%) and the food, beverage and tobacco (-6.5%) subsectors led the decrease. The motor vehicle and parts subsector was down for the second consecutive month, while the food, beverage and tobacco subsector declined for the second time in four months.

Wholesale inventories increase for the second consecutive month

Wholesale inventories rose for the second consecutive month, up 1.4% to a record $84.0 billion in May. Five of seven subsectors posted increases, representing 90% of total wholesale inventories.

In dollar terms, the machinery, equipment and supplies subsector (+1.6%) posted the largest gain, following a 0.3% decline in April. Three of four industries increased, with the other machinery, equipment and supplies industry contributing the most to the upturn.

Inventories grew 2.7% in the miscellaneous subsector, a third consecutive monthly gain. Increases were reported by all five industries and were led by increased stock in the other miscellaneous industry (+4.0%).

The building material and supplies subsector (+2.0%) rose for the third consecutive month, on the strength of higher inventories in the metal service centres (+3.8%) and the lumber, millwork, hardware and other building supplies (+1.6%) industries.

Higher inventories in the motor vehicle and parts subsector (+2.0%) were led by increased stock in the motor vehicle industry (+2.9%).

The inventory-to-sales ratio increased from 1.31 in April to 1.32 in May. This ratio is a measure of the time in months required to exhaust inventories if sales were to remain at their current level.

StatsCanada

Trade and currency wars a market threat

Monday July 23: Five things the markets are talking about

A new week starts with equities under pressure as capital markets digest warnings from G20 finance ministers about the impact of protectionism on growth – “risks to the world economy have increased.”

Also raising concerns is the Sino-U.S trade war is now spilling over into currency markets with President Trump rhetoric supporting the U.S administration preference for lower U.S dollar interest rates and a weaker currency.

Elsewhere, the yen (¥111.00) has found support while JGB’s slid on speculation about Bank of Japan’s (BoJ) stimulus. Crude prices trade a tad softer amid concern the escalating trade rows will destabilize energy demand.

On tap: an E.U Trade Commission is due to arrive stateside this week for trade talks. Expect some tough questions, demands and their own list of retaliatory measures in response to proposed U.S tariffs. The highlight of the week should be Thursday’s European Central Bank (ECB) monetary policy meeting.

1. Stocks start the week under pressure

Japan’s Nikkei fell to a ten-day low overnight, with exporters under pressure by the yen’s (¥111.00) rally and by market speculation that the Bank of Japan (BoJ) could wind back its exchange-traded fund purchases. The Nikkei ended the day down -1.33%.

Note: The market is speculating that the BoJ could debate changes in its monetary policy at its upcoming meeting, with potential tweaks to its interest rate targets and stock-buying techniques on the table.

Down-under, Aussie shares fell on President Trump’s threat to impose tariffs on all Chinese imports. The S&P/ASX 200 index declined -0.9% at the close of trade. The benchmark gained +0.4% on Friday. In S. Korea, it was a similar story. The Kospi fell about -1% overnight following Trump’s comments about tariff’s and the currency last week.

In China, stocks rallied on Monday, aided by strength in financials and industrial stocks, but a slump in healthcare shares capped the broader gains. The blue-chip CSI300 index rose +0.9% while the Shanghai Composite Index ended up +1.1%.

In Hong Kong, it was a similar story. Stocks rose slightly overnight, as declines in tech and consumer shares were offset by strength in financials. The Hang Seng index rose +0.1%, while the China Enterprises Index gained +0.5%.

In Europe, regional bourses are trading mostly lower across the board, following a mixed session in Asia. The Italian FTSE MIB is in focus following weakness in shares of Fiat and Ferrari after the stepping down of its CEO Sergio Marchionne due to health.

U.S stocks are set to open in the ‘red’ (-0.1%).

Indices: Stoxx600 -0.1% at 385.1, FTSE -0.4% at 7651, DAX -0.1% at 12549, CAC-40 -0.3% at 5382, IBEX-35 +0.2% at 9743, FTSE MIB -0.1% at 21,775, SMI -0.5% at 8947, S&P 500 Futures -0.1%

2. Oil steady after G20 warns of risks to growth, gold higher

Oil prices have stabilized as worries over production losses were outweighed by concerns that trade disputes would reduce economic growth and hit global energy demand.

Benchmark Brent crude oil is up +15c at +$73.22 a barrel, while U.S light crude is unchanged at +$68.26.

G20 Finance ministers over the weekend called for more dialogue to prevent trade and geopolitical tensions from hurting growth as “downside risks over the short and medium term have increased.”

Note: Baker Hughes data on Friday showed that U.S energy companies last week cut the number of oil rigs by the most since March following recent declines in oil prices. Drillers cut five oilrigs in the week to July 20, bringing the count down to 858.

Ahead of the U.S open, gold prices are steady atop of a one-week high as the dollar eased to a two week low after President Trump criticised the Fed’s interest rate tightening policy. Spot gold holds steady at +$1,231 an ounce. U.S gold futures for August delivery are nearly unchanged at +$1,231 an ounce.

3. Japan yields in focus

JGB’s have sold-off along the curve on reports late Friday that the BoJ might consider changes to interest rate targets. The market is speculating that the BoJ might be willing to let 10-year JGB yields (+0%) rise to some degree including a possible hike of the target level. Overnight, JGB 2-, 10- and 30-year yields were higher (+1.8, +4.5, and +8.0 bps respectively).

BoJ officials said to be looking for ways to keep stimulus program sustainable while reducing the harm it causes to markets and bank profits.

Note: The BoJ stepped in to buy unlimited bonds at a fixed rate of +0.11%, to cap the move.

On tap for this week: The ECB monetary policy meeting is on Thursday, no policy stance expected, but the market is looking for clarification on their first potential rate hike.

Elsewhere, the yield on 10-year Treasuries gained less +1 bps to +2.90%, the highest in more than a month, while in the U.K; the 10-year Gilt yield advanced +1 bps to +1.232%.

4. Dollar under pressure from Trump rhetoric

The ‘mighty’ USD maintains its softer tone after President Trump criticized the Fed for raising interest rates and suggested the USD was too strong.

Aside from currency Twitter rants, the markets focus this week will be on the ECB rate decision and press conference on Thursday. Consensus is ‘not’ anticipating any policy change in the short to medium term, however, the markets will be on the lookout for any clarification on the first potential rate hike. The EUR/USD is still flipping alternately between moves towards €1.16 and over €1.17 in response to news on the trade row, given the lack of clear direction.

GBP (£1.3124) continues to remain vulnerable to “headline risk,” but consensus believes a lot of negativity seems to be already priced. With parliament in recess, sterling has the potential to stage a modest retracement from its current area.

5. G20 communiqué

In their final communiqué yesterday from their meeting in Argentina, finance ministers and central bankers from the G20 economies said, “Heightened trade and geopolitical tensions pose an increased risk to global growth” and called for greater dialogue.

“Global growth remains robust and unemployment is at a decade low. However, growth has become less synchronised recently, and downside risks over the sort and medium term have increased,” said the communiqué.

Forex heatmap

Dollar Rally Ends With Trump Monetary Policy and Currency War Comments

The USD fell against major pairs on Friday after US President Donald Trump tweeted that China and the EU manipulate their currency. Trade war escalation has reached a second phase at a time when American politics are having an identity crisis with the ongoing Russian interference during the 2016 elections. Steven Mnuchin will head to Buenos Aires to take part in the finance ministers G20 meeting with trade and monetary policies sure to be a topic of discussion. The European Central Bank (ECB) will announce its main refinancing rate on Thursday, July 26 at 7:45 am EDT with little expectations of a change. ECB President Mario Draghi will host a press conference at 8:30 am EDT with the market focused on his comments for insights into the monetary policy of the central bank.

  • US President worried about Fed’s monetary policy triggers currency war
  • European Central Bank meeting anticipated to be a quiet affair
  • Canadian inflation and retail sales beat expectations

EUR Rises Ahead of ECB as Currency War Concerns Rise

The EUR/USD gained 0.28 percent in the last week. The single currency is trading at 1.1717 after a volatile week is over. The EUR rose 0.73 percent on Friday as Trump’s comments on currency manipulation hit the newswires. The US dollar had fallen on Thursday after President Trump criticized the U.S. Federal Reserve for raising rates and eroding the competitiveness of American products.



In an interview with CNBC the US President said he was not thrilled with the path of interest rates, although he did mention that he would let them do what they feel is best. Earlier in the week Fed Chair Powell testified before the Senate Banking Committee and the House Financial Services Committee side-stepping any comments on trade spats.

The U.S. Federal Reserve has hiked two times already in 2018 leaving the benchmark rate at 175 to 200 basis points. The CME FedWatch tool shows a 86.9 percent chance of a September rate hike and 53.9 percent of a follow up in December. Both sets of probabilities where higher on Wednesday before Trump’s comments were released.

The economic calendar will not feature a large number of North American indicators with the main standout being the release of the first estimate of the US GDP data on Friday, July 27. Analysts forecast a rise of 4.1 percent and could serve as an antidote to Trump’s tweets. The European Central Bank (ECB) will feature on Thursday, but there is little expectation that new guidance will be provided after the June monetary policy meeting.

Loonie Higher on Strong Retail Sales and Inflation Data

The Canadian dollar rose on Friday after the release of retail sales and inflation data. The USD/CAD DROPPED 0.05 percent on a weekly basis. The currency pair is trading at 1.3146 after Canadian retail sales surprised with a 2 percent rise to a seven month high boosted by auto and gasoline sales on Friday. Inflation rose 2.5 on an annual basis in June also impacted by higher gasoline prices. The economic indicators validate the decision of the Bank of Canada (BoC) earlier this month to hike rates by 25 basis points and could further pressure the central bank to lift rates higher despite growing geopolitical headwinds.


Canadian dollar weekly graph July 16, 2018

The US dollar has been on a downward trend since President Trump issued some sharp criticism on the U.S. Federal Reserve monetary policy. The comments took the market by surprise as talking about the currency is not usually the job of the President, but rather the Treasury Secretary. The statements will most likely be discussed as the G20 meeting in Buenos Aires kicks off.

The US President continued to tweet about the unfair strength of the greenback which responded by falling more than 1 percent against the Canadian dollar.

Oil prices recovered from losses earlier in the week but West Texas Intermediate will finish below $70 after concerns about the increase in supply outstripping rising demand.

The GBP/USD dropped 0.76 percent in the last five days. The currency pari is trading at 1.3133 with political headwinds keeping the pound under pressure. The confusing Brexit strategy from the UK government could end up costing Prime Minister May her job as she scrambles to call an early summer recess to avoid challenge to her leadership.



The Bank of England (BoE) held rates unchanged in June, but there were three dissenters. The economic data could support an August rate hike by the central bank, but the question now is will MPC vote for higher rates holding to its mandate, but with a high possibility that Brexit negotiations once again threaten the growth of the UK economy and the reverse action is needed. The market still believes in an August rate hike, but the GBP will continue under pressure from political uncertainty at home and abroad.

Market events to watch this week:

Tuesday, July 24
9:30pm AUD CPI q/q
Wednesday, July 25
10:30am USD Crude Oil Inventories
Thursday, July 26
7:45am EUR Main Refinancing Rate
8:30am EUR ECB Press Conference
8:30am USD Core Durable Goods Orders m/m
Friday, July 27
8:30am USD Advance GDP q/q

*All times EDT
For a complete list of scheduled events in the forex market visit the MarketPulse Economic Calendar

Canada: Inflation Hit Six-Year-Plus High

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose 2.5% on a year-over-year basis in June, following a 2.2% increase in May. This is the largest year-over-year increase in the CPI since February 2012.

This month’s year-over-year CPI increase follows a year of gradual acceleration in consumer price inflation, from a recent low of 1.0% year over year in June 2017. This trend reflects increases in prices for gasoline and food purchased from restaurants, as well as offsetting factors such as lower price inflation for electricity and telephone services. These movements coincide with recent improvements in the economy and the labour market, as well as an increase in oil prices.

Component highlights

Seven of eight major components rose year over year. The transportation index (+6.6%) was the largest contributor to the year-over-year increase, while the household operations, furnishings and equipment index (-0.1%) was the lone major component to decline.

Energy costs were 12.4% higher compared with June 2017, after increasing 11.6% year over year in May. Year-over-year gains in prices for gasoline (+24.6%) and fuel oil and other fuels (+25.9%) were larger in June than in May, as sustained increases in crude oil prices and exchange rate pressures continued to impact consumer prices. Prices for durable goods rose 0.6% year over year, led by growth in the purchase of passenger vehicles index (+1.8%). This gain is attributable to lower rebates on 2019 model-year vehicles.

Year-over-year gains in the price of services were lower in June (+2.2%) than in May (+2.3%), moderating the growth in the CPI. Prices for telephone services (-8.8%) continued to decline year over year, amid a series of industry-wide price promotions. Consumers paid 8.4% less for travel tours compared with June 2017. The homeowners’ replacement cost index increased less on a year-over-year basis in June (+1.4%) than in May (+2.0%).

Regional highlights

Prices rose more in six provinces in June on a year-over-year basis compared with the previous month. This growth was strongest in Prince Edward Island, where prices increased 2.9%.

The CPI in Newfoundland and Labrador rose 2.3% in June. Gasoline prices were up 16.5% in the 12 months to June after increasing 5.5% the previous month.

Seasonally adjusted monthly Consumer Price Index

On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, the CPI rose 0.1% in June, matching the increase in May. Six of eight major components increased, while the household operations, furnishings and equipment index (-0.3%) and the recreation, education and reading index (-0.6%) both declined.

StatsCanada

Canada: Retail trade, May 2018

Retail sales increased 2.0% in May to $50.8 billion, following a 0.9% decline in April. Sales rose in 8 of 11 subsectors, representing 70% of retail trade.

Higher sales at motor vehicle and parts dealers and at gasoline stations were the main contributors to the gain in May. Excluding these two subsectors, retail sales were up 0.9%.

After removing the effects of price changes, retail sales in volume terms increased 2.0%.

Sales rebound in several subsectors

Sales at motor vehicle and parts dealers (+3.7%) made almost a full rebound following a 3.8% decline in April, which had unseasonably cool temperatures and inclement weather in many parts of the country.

Receipts at gasoline stations (+4.3%) were up for the second month in a row, partially reflecting higher prices at the pump. Sales in volume terms at gasoline stations rose 2.7%.

General merchandise stores (+3.2%), building material and garden equipment and supplies dealers (+5.4%) and clothing and clothing accessories stores (+2.8%) also contributed to the gain. Increases in each of these subsectors more than offset the declines that had been reported in April.

Food and beverage stores (-2.1%) posted a sales decline for the fourth time in five months. The decrease in May was primarily due to lower sales at supermarkets and other grocery stores (-3.1%).

According to the Retail Commodity Survey, 20.6% of food sales took place at general merchandise stores in the first quarter of 2018 compared with 19.1% in 2017. During the same period, 75.1% of food sales came from the food and beverage stores subsector, down from 76.5% in 2017.

Higher sales in seven provinces, led by Ontario and Quebec

Seven provinces reported higher sales in May, with Ontario and Quebec more than offsetting their declines from April.

Sales in Ontario (+2.6%) increased for the fourth time in five months. Higher sales at motor vehicle and parts dealers accounted for the majority of the increase in May. Sales in the Toronto census metropolitan area (CMA) were up 1.4%.

In Quebec, sales increased 3.0%, following a 2.6% decline in April. Sales were up 1.4% in the Montréal CMA.

E-commerce sales by Canadian retailers

The figures in this section are based on unadjusted (that is, not seasonally adjusted) estimates.

On an unadjusted basis, retail e-commerce sales totalled $1.4 billion, representing 2.5% of total retail trade. On a year-over-year basis, retail e-commerce rose 16.9%, while total unadjusted sales increased 5.5%.

StatsCanada