GBP/JPY – Bearish Breakout Ahead of Jobs Data and BoE

OANDA Senior Market Analyst Craig Erlam talks to Core Finance about the recent bearish break in GBPJPY and whether it signals more pain ahead. He also previews the UK jobs data and Bank of England inflation report hearing and what they could mean for interest rates this year.

USD/JPY – Japanese Yen Edges Lower as Japanese Manufacturing PMI Dips

BoE Hearing and Fed Minutes in Focus

DAX Under Pressure, Investors Eye Fed Minutes

BoE Hearing and Fed Minutes in Focus

US Futures Continue to Pare Last Week’s Gains

US equity markets are expected to open in the red again on Wednesday, tracking losses in Europe as stocks continue to pare last week’s strong rebound.

It’s been a relatively quiet start to the morning and the week, with the bank holiday in the US and Canada contributing to this. The European session has been dominated by economic data releases so far and that’s likely to continue, with flash manufacturing and services data due from the US shortly after the open. It’s the FOMC minutes that will be released later in the day though that will likely be the standout event from a US perspective, particularly as the statement caused quite a stir at the end of January.

US Yield Curve Now (Orange) and on 29 January 2018 (Purple)

Source – Thomson Reuters Eikon

The sell-off in the markets may have come a couple of days later but part of the initial trigger was a more hawkish sounding Fed, with the jobs report then being the straw that broke the camel’s back two days later. While the minutes may not generate quite the same response, traders will likely monitor what they say very closely for signs that policy makers are now leaning more towards three to four rate hikes this year, rather than two or three.

EUR/USD – Euro Ticks Lower as German Manufacturing PMI Softens

GBP Slips as Unemployment Ticks Higher

Sterling is coming under a bit of pressure this morning after UK jobs data for the three months to December showed wages still growing at a moderate pace and unemployment ticking up to 4.4%. While a higher reading on wage growth may have triggered a more bullish response from the pound, the data turned out to be quite insignificant as it’s unlikely to change the views at the Bank of England.

UK Unemployment Rate

Wages have been slowly ticking higher recently and they could continue to do so as workers demand more due to the higher cost of living and a tight labour market. The move higher in the unemployment rate won’t be a concern at this moment with it potentially being a one-off move and still very low. As long as inflation remains at upper range of what is deemed acceptable, the central bank seems intent on raising rates at least once more this year, despite the temporary factors driving it and economic uncertainty that lies ahead.

Yield-o-Mania

BoE Inflation Report Hearing Eyed as Markets Price in Rate Hikes

Members of the Monetary Policy Committee including Governor Mark Carney will appear before the Treasury Select Committee later on today, during which they will be questioned on their latest inflation report forecasts and expectations for interest rates going forward. While it’s always interesting to get the views of policy makers and the pound will likely be volatile throughout, I wonder how much of what they have to say will now already be priced in, with at least one rate hike now expected this year.

GBPUSD Daily Chart

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With that in mind and with Brexit transition negotiations likely to dominate the next month, we could see the pound lose some of the momentum that’s been gathering over the last six months or so. It’s recent failed to make new highs on two occasions against the dollar and it’s also slipping against the yen in a possible sign that traders are beginning to lock in profits ahead of what could be a difficult month.

Economic Calendar

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

Yield-o-Mania

Yield-o-Mania

Global yields ratcheted higher after a stronger than expected jump on Germany’s PPI which bolsters the hotter than expected comprehensive inflation narrative. But it was the jump in US 2-year note yields that provided the extra boost to the US dollar as shorter-dated tenors provides investors with better goalposts for determining how the market is viewing Fed sentiment

However, the lukewarm demand for two-year notes at auction and with supply concerns expected to weigh heavy on investor bond appetite this week, we could see the dollar back under pressure. Of course, traders are erring on the side of caution ahead of the release of the FOMC Jan 30-31 minutes and given the short dollar bus had reached standing room only portions, the short-term pause in this year’s grand dollar sell-off was not too unexpected.
US stock markets

US equity markets fell overnight on the back of higher US Treasury yields which are providing investors with more income than dividends on the S&P 500 Index. While the prospect of higher interest rates will keep investors on edge, it’s not like we’re returning to double-digit levels or the Fed is moving its terminal rate.So even the uptick in ten-year yields to 3 % or even 3.25 % is unlikely to kill the equity market rally as the benefits from fiscal stimulus should continue to feed through the markets. Investors are banking on much higher returns from equities than bonds again in 2018.

Oil markets

Amid OPEC supply compliance, WTI markets are focusing on dwindling inflow of Crude from Canada to Cushing due to limited accommodation on the Keystone pipeline.The disruption is providing a fillip to WTI prices while the stronger dollar has Brent prices falling and narrowing the WTI-Brent spread. Also, WTI is getting a boost from rising exports attributed to better infrastructure connecting the Permian Basin to the Gulf Coast. But of course, we are tapering expectation on WTI rally as the USD continues to find firmer footing.

Gold markets

A tough week for the Gold market so far as the dollar has rebounded and US Bond yields have jumped higher ahead of the FOMC minutes. Traders are hedging for a possible shift in guidance given the uptick in inflation, so this presents a significant market tail risk which could cause traders to reprice rate hike expectations in 2019 aggressively higher. A quicker and steeper slope of interest rate normalisation offers the most prominent near-term threat to gold prices as this outcome will send the USD surging.
G-10

The Euro

The lack of demand for EUR Monday certainly opened the door, and predictably on the first sign of abject news, we dipped to the low 1.23’s after the German ZEW survey plunged. The market is forever a discounting mechanism and given the extremely disappointing price action from the long perspective; it triggered one-way position squaring ahead of the FOMC minutes. And while the bullish EUR narrative continues to resonate, both bearish and bullish views will be inevitably challenged with Italian elections, January NFP and an ECB meeting due over the next few weeks so near-term convictions could turn neutral and tarnish the EUR appeal

The Japanese Yen

The USDJPY should be the best game in town this week especially if traders interpret the FOMC minute’s  colour as bold. However, the risks are balanced entering the FOMC minutes as the recent uptick in volatility could have as much bearing on Fed policy decision as the subtle rise in inflation

But until the market takes out the significant 108.15 level I continue to view the current move as little more than a pre FOMC meeting squeeze driven by yields and positioning and believe there will be substantial resistance between 107.50-108 levels.
The Australian Dollar

Pre-data comments. Given the RBA has been very vocal on wage growth as the missing piece of the economic puzzle, today’s Wage Price Index will attract an unusual amount of focus. Unfortunately, everyone is looking at this trade so the news reading algorithms will likely get there well ahead of everyone on a surprise uptick.

The Malaysian Ringgit

Riskier currencies are trading on poor footing given the firmer dollar and negative global equity sentiment. And of course, we can not overlook higher US yields which are driving opinions this week. This package of coincidences does not make a very conducive environment for regional risk.

FX Market Analysis – 20 February 2018 (Video)

Senior Market Analyst Craig Erlam discusses this week’s key event risks, with the most notable being the UK jobs report and BoE inflation report hearing.

Craig also gives his live analysis on EURUSD (11:04), GBPUSD (15:13), EURGBP (17:04), AUDUSD (18:36), USDCAD (20:02), GBPCAD (22:01), NZDUSD (24:47), USDJPY (25:44), GBPJPY (26:47) and EURJPY (28:24).

USD/JPY – Dollar Punches Above 107 Yen, Fed Minutes Ahead

Higher Yields Pushing Dollar Up

Intermezzo

US Bond Auction TIPS the dollar

US Bond Auction TIPS the dollar

A dismal US 30year TIPS auction is weighing on dollar demand as the sagging bid to cover ratio of 2.31 is signalling dwindling investor appetite as inflationary headwinds build. The dollar is lower because no one wants to own US bonds despite the higher yield, knowing the inflationary headwinds will push yields higher and bond prices lower

The market remains nonplussed by the breakdown of FX /Interest rate correlations and while the debate still rages concerning Wednesday dollar sell-off. I think its time to throw textbook economics out the window as well as the so-called interest rate pivot point. G-10 yield differentials are so tiny that traders could care less about differentials as they become increasingly focused on the future outlook of the expanding US deficits and in particular the budget deficit

Another hot inflation reading as PPI showed a substantial gain but provided no bounce to the buck. When real money is taking the dollar to the woodshed and reluctant to own greenbacks in anyway shape or form, it matters little what the Feds are doing or yields for that matter. And by all indications, we could be in the early stages of protracted dollar sell-off.
Equity Markets

Equity investors are in a happy spot as US stock markets carved out their fifth consecutive day of gains. Despite a midday swoon, markets roared back as investors view the uptick in inflation as non-threatening and remain in buy on dip mode as last weeks equity meltdown looks more and more like an illogical outlier than ever.

Oil Markets

After the decent bounce on the back weaker dollar and Khalid al-Falih suggesting no imminent demise of OPEC and non-member compliance. Not unexpected the markets are becoming a bit more position sensitive heading into the weekend. The weaker US dollar has been a significant component driving market sentiment, and with the dollar entering oversold territory at weeks end, we could see short dollar position pared which could negatively impact interday oil prices.

Frankly giving the evolving vital narratives surrounding OPEC compliance vs Shale output I expect the WTI whipsaw to be as active next week as it was this week. But given the overly bearish outlook for the greenback, we may have printed a short-term floor and dips will remain supported.

Gold Markets

There was very little follow through on the much hotter than expected US PPI print which convinced investors to book some profits after gold rallied hard the previous session. A while the weaker USD is underpinning gold prices, the short dollar speculators a bit overextend suggesting the market could pare back US short dollar risk which may temper topside expectations for Gold prices today. Medium-term bullish conviction remains intact given the higher US inflation profile and weaker USD narrative.

Crypto Markets

Bitcoin buyers were back en masse chasing the dream as the fear of missing ( FOMO)out propelled BTC above 10,000. It appears the recent wave or regulatory worries have been tempered as the massive South Korean market could roar back to life as rumours are circulating that Seoul is looking at licencing several exchanges adding a level of credibility and shoring up severely dented investor confidence.
Currency Markets

The Japanese Yen

Talking about FOMO, is there anyone who is not short USDJPY? Of course, “the crowded trade theory” did cross my mind overnight, for second or two, as USDJPY powered back to 106.80 overnight on the Wakatabe headline, before pressing the sell button again. Dovish or not the market cares little about centeral bank policy these days while looking for any and all opportunities to hammer the dollar mercilessly. With very little chance of intervention at these levels, the JPY bulls should continue to have their way near-term.But short-term speculators are a bit stretched so now is not the time to get greedy.Let’s see what fortunes next week brings.

The Euro

It looks like the grind higher is back in fashion, and the upticks have been relentless over the past 24 hours. But unlike the recent test of 1.25 positioning is much lighter so we could punch higher as traders continue moan over not buying the dips to the low 1.22’s

The Malaysian Ringgit

Powerful bullish signals are falling on deaf ears as investors are far and few between due to Chinese Lunar New Year and quite frankly it’s not worth paying the holiday liquidity premiums to put on risk. Very little offshore interest today so expect the market to remain quiet.

Calm Returns to Markets Ahead of BoE Event

US Futures Flat After Uneventful Session in Europe

A sense of calm appears to be gradually returning to financial markets as we near the end of the week, with indices in Europe trading a little lower and US futures flat after ending Wednesday’s session in a similar manner.

While volatility in the markets has eased over the last couple of days, it has remained at very high levels which is probably a sign of the ongoing nervousness among investors which may leave markets vulnerable to further declines. Still, the European session has so far been relatively uneventful compared to the last few days which may be a positive sign ahead of the open in the US.

The sell-off on Monday was widely attributed to rising yields on the back of higher interest rate expectations in the US and Europe, although it was likely exacerbated by a combination of other factors, such as automated trading and fear of a broader correction given how long it had been since the last. It’s interesting then that while yields fell after the stock market sell-off, they have been creeping higher again and now find themselves not far from the levels they were at on Monday. Should we avoid another plunge in stocks, it would suggest that yields may have been the catalyst but ultimately, the selling that followed was driven by other factors, perhaps including a belief that a correction was overdue.

Are BoE Interest Rate Expectations Too Bullish?

Will Carney Adopt Cautious Approach Given Market Volatility?

It will be very interesting to see what approach the Bank of England takes when it holds its quarterly press conference later on, given the recent market volatility. Central banks typically approach these events with incredible caution due to the ability of a seemingly harmless comment to cause excessive swings as traders pick apart everything that’s said.

Governor Mark Carney may have to be extra careful today then, particularly if the BoE is planning to lay the foundation for a rate hike this year, with an increasing number of people suggesting one will come in May. I remain unconvinced by this given the amount of economic uncertainty, soft economic data and the fact that inflation is believed to have peaked. Should the new forecasts contain an upgrade to the inflation outlook then perhaps this will nudge policy makers towards raising interest rates again.

GBPUSD Daily Chart

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With no change in interest rates expected, traders will be paying very close attention to the new forecasts, as well as the press conference with Carney and his colleagues. If the BoE is considering a hike in May, you would expect it to start laying the groundwork for it today and at the meeting in March, which could provide additional upside pressure in UK debt and sterling, which is already trading at pre-referendum levels against the dollar.

Market Jitters Remain

Crypto Rebound May Be Short-Lived

The rebound in bitcoin is continuing today, with the cryptocurrency now up more than 40% from the lows posted two days ago. In any other asset other than cryptocurrencies, this kind of move would be staggering but instead this is just another day for bitcoin. It is also only a small rebound compared to the declines it’s seen over the last couple of months and may prove to be yet another dead cat bounce, albeit one that exceeds 40%.

Bitcoin Daily Chart

Source – Thomson Reuters Eikon

I’m not convinced yet that any rebound will be sustained as we continue to see a steady stream of negative news flow which has severely damaged sentiment in cryptocurrencies. The rally towards the end of last year was driven by the buzz and positive sentiment towards bitcoin and its peers – as well as a large speculative push from FOMO traders – and the reversal of this has equally weighed heavily on it. If that continues, I see no reason why it won’t be back below $6,000 in the not too distant future.

Economic Calendar

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

Are BoE Interest Rate Expectations Too Bullish?

BoE to Release New Economic Forecasts Alongside Rate Decision

The Bank of England holds its first monetary policy meeting of the year this week, after which it will release the quarterly inflation report alongside its monetary policy decision and hold a press conference with Governor Mark Carney.

The event – which is often referred to as “Super Thursday” – is one of the most hotly anticipated of the UK calendar as it offers significant insight into the thoughts of the Monetary Policy Committee, something that’s become increasingly sought after since it started raising interest rates in November.

BoE policy makers took the decision to raise interest rates after inflation surpassed 3% in November, a level deemed by many to be too high despite being driven by one-off currency moves in the aftermath of Brexit. This is led many economists to forecast another hike this year and two more over the three forecasting period, but have they and others been misled by the central bank?

GBP/USD – Pound Under Pressure, BoE Rate Decision Next

In many ways, the dilemma facing the BoE is no different than that facing other central banks – the economy is growing, unemployment is very low, labour market slack appears low and yet inflation is stubbornly low – but one very important difference exists, Brexit.

The sheer amount of uncertainty that exists because of Brexit has resulted in low growth compared to its peers and its pre-referendum levels, businesses are reluctant to invest and the consumer squeeze is taking its toll. The economy may well have shown more resilience than many feared prior to the referendum but is this really the kind of environment that the central bank should be raising rates in? If not, why did they raise by 25 basis points in November?

The central bank will naturally point to the above target inflation as warranting a hike which would be fair, assuming they believed it would remain at those levels of exceed it, which is debatable. This would also indicate a willingness to raise more if inflation remains well above target. While it’s likely to have peaked, it’s not expected to fall very far for a while which is why people may be anticipating further hikes.

Another possibility could be that they wanted to reverse the emergency post-Brexit rate cut which many Brexiteers criticized at the time and some others have questioned the need for since. Especially when you consider that the central bank was reluctant to move below 0.5% throughout the aftermath of the global financial crisis and eurozone debt crisis. If lower rates were seen as risky or unnecessary then, can they possibly be warranted now? If not and this was behind November’s decision, are the markets wrong in anticipating another hike this year and more after?

Gold Slides to 4-Week Low as Stock Markets Settles Down

This could become a lot clearer in the coming meetings and Thursday should offer some early insight, particularly as the inflation report includes growth and inflation forecasts. Any indication that policy makers are in no rush to raise again could see markets pare back expectations resulting in lower yields on UK debt which could in turn weigh on the pound. We may not get this on Thursday though, assuming we do at all, as they may opt to gradually soften their stance over a number of meetings, particularly if Brexit negotiations aren’t progressing as planned. Ultimately, these will have a major bearing on how interest rates move over the three year forecast period.

GBPUSD Daily Chart

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The FTSE 100 may also be sensitive to the BoE event on Thursday, given its inverse relationship with the pound. A stronger pound has typically weighed on the index due to the external exposure of the companies that make up the index, while a weaker pound has been positive for it, as seen in the aftermath of the referendum. It’s been a rough couple of weeks for the FTSE, the last couple of days in particular as volatility has returned in force and equities have been sent into a tailspin lower. A strengthening pound – should the BoE release bullish forecasts and adopt a hawkish tone – may not help matters.

FTSE and GBP Trade Weighted Index Correlation

Source – Thomson Reuters Eikon

Weekly FX Market Update – 6 February 2018 (Video)

It’s been an extremely turbulent 24 hours in the financial market with the Dow recording its largest ever daily points drop as panic set in and traders tried to work out what was triggering such a strong sell-off. Markets have stabilized a little on Tuesday but there remains some concern among traders which continues to weigh.

Senior Market Analyst Craig Erlam talks about what he thinks has triggered such a move and goes through this week’s other key events in the markets.

He also gives his live analysis on EURUSD (18:08), GBPUSD (20:02), EURGBP (22:12), AUDUSD (23:32), USDCAD (25:10), GBPCAD (27:16), NZDUSD (28:54), USDJPY (30:58), GBPJPY (32:53) and EURJPY (34:12).

DAX Recovers After Falling to 5-Month Low

Beware: FX Space is Calm, But Appearances Can Be Deceiving

Plop Plop Fizz Fizz Oh What a Relief it is

Plop Plop Fizz Fizz oh what a relief it is

Plop Plop Fizz Fizz oh what a relief it is

A case of turnaround Tuesday or merely the eye of the storm?
What a wild ride the past 48 hours !!  and of course the downward correction in equity market was always on the cards as a combination of multi-year high bond yields, and record highs in US equity markets were foolishly unsustainable. And with interest rates sure to be on the move, equity markets were first to blink. But the voraciousness of the purge is what had many scratching their head, but in reality, in this day of computer-driven algorithmic trading this is not the first nor will it be the last mini flash crash to come.

There was nothing that particularly stood out other than an abundance of inflationary wood chips that formed into combustible markets resulting in the sudden repricing of risk.

But at the end of day bargain hunters reemerged as S&P closed +1.74% with levels marking the area from which Monday’s late NY session sell-off begun.But with so much volatility lingering, equity market will have  lot’s of wood to chop  to restore investors confidence

Adding some calm to the proceedings St. Louis Fed President James Bullard, a non-voting member of the Federal Open Market Committee, attempted to dampen US rate hike euphoria stemming from Friday’s spike in average hourly earnings. He said, “I caution against interpreting good news from labour markets as translating directly into higher inflation.”

OIL

WTI oil prices recovered most of the afternoon losses, rising from $63.45/barrel at the close just shy of 64.0/ barrel in after-hours trading. API weekly crude inventories did not raise as much as forecast.
But near-term sentiment remains tethered to yo-yo strings with equities and the dollar providing the counterweights. Risk aversion does not bode well for oil prices and with all the chatter( including the November EIA report)  about US production ramping up there could be a growing propensity to move lower near-term

Gold

Gold prices hit session lows late Tuesday afternoon as U.S. stocks bounced back up. But with asset rotation from equity to bonds, gold prices did not benefit from this uptick in volatility as investors are erring on the more conservative Bond route given the market volatility. Equity gold hedged unwound in favour a more traditional bond market approach as investors opt to sit out this Volatility ( VIX) driven storm

Far too much volatility in the market and investors across all asset classes remain spooked
Currency Markets

The Japanese Yen

Traditional correlations are finally beginning to assert so we should look for shifting risk sentiment to dominate the forthcoming sessions.

The Euro

EURUSD is entering a period of consolidation in the short term and yesterday certainly matched that argument. But Reuters reports that a final coalition deal is expected at some point late Tuesday in Europe.

The Australian Dollar

The AUD bulls are still licking their wounds after, with the RBA’s dovish twist to guidance feeble retail sales and trade data. However, if you adhere to the Yuan -AUD correlations proxy, one should not exclude the Aussie dollar just yet as the currency is nowhere near down for the count.

The Chinese Yuan

Acting as a haven and rightly so as the CNH remains very resilient to broader US moves. The Pboc 2018 working conference statement has cemented the view that the Mainland is putting more emphasis on opening up Bond markets while promoting the liberalisation of the Yuan. A real win for foreign investors who are finally seeing the barrier to enter China capital markets gradually fall by the wayside.

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The Malaysian Ringgit

We should not lose sight of the great strides that the Ringgit has made over the past 12 months and while investors confidence will be tested during this sudden uptick in volatility the Ringgit will be more than up for the task.

Malaysia economy remains robust; OIL prices remain firm.With that in mind, Equity and bond markets will continue to attract investors who want exposure in the Ringgit. AS we still hold the view that the Ringgit will be less susceptible to other regional currencies as the BNM could increase interest rates again, Malaysia is the most significant oil exporter, and the central bank welcomes a stronger MYR